Technology

0xhh/TinyE8: Ben Eater’s 8 bit breadboard computer emulator in C++

TinyE8 emulates Ben Eater’s 8 bit breadboard CPU. Implemented all the Instructions except JC and JZ, I need to watch the whole playlist before implementing these two instructions..

Here are some screenshots:

screenshot1

Source code is extensively commented, so that it is readable.

Instruction set

 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| 0000 - NOP --> No Operation
| 0001 - LDA --> Load contents of a memory address XXXX into A register
| 0010 - ADD --> Load contents of a memory address XXXX into B register, then performs A+B and stores the result in A register
| 0011 - SUB --> Load contents of a memory address XXXX into B register, then performs A-B and stores the result in A register
| 0100 - STA --> Store contents of A register at memory address XXXX
| 0101 - LDI --> Load 4 bit immediate value into A register
| 0110 - JMP --> Unconditional jump: sets program counter to XXXX and executes from there
| 0111 - JC  --> Jump if carry: sets program counter to XXXX when carry flag is set and executes from there
| 1000 - JZ  --> Jump if zero: sets program counter to XXXX when zero flag is set and executes from there
| 1110 - OUT --> Output contents of A register to 7 segment display, in our case, we'll print it on console
| 1111 - HLT --> Halts the execution
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In the mean time feel free to fork, implement these instructions and start a pull request. I’ll verify changes and merge it to the main branch.

Example: Add 7 and 3

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| LDA 0000	;0000 is the memory address of 7 in the RAM. 7 is present at 0000
| ADD 0001	;0001 is the memory address 0f 3 in the RAM. 3 is present at 0001	
| OUT XXXX	;we don't care about XXXX, all we want is whether the last 4 bits are OUT instruction's or not
| HLT XXXX	;similarly, for HLT, we only check the last 4 bits	
|
| ;In Memory or RAM, the values are stored as follows
|	
| ;at 0000 we store 7 or in C syntax, we can represent it as memory[0] = 7;
| ;similarly at 0001, we store 3, or memory[1] = 3;
| ;The output should be 10
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Implemented Instructions:

Loading your own program

Loading your own program from .bin file

Create .asm file and write your assembly program in it.
The program should contain atleast 16 lines and each line should consist of 1 or 2 instructions

For example: If you want to write a program that adds 7 and 3 and then subtracts 2 from it, it should something like this

LDA 8
ADD 9
SUB 10
OUT 0
NOP
NOP
NOP
NOP
7
3
2
NOP
NOP
NOP
NOP
NOP

At line 0, we can see LDA 8, this means that, it loads value from address 8 into A register. This address 8 is at line 8 which has a value of 7. So, it Loads 7 into A register.

At line 1, we have ADD 9, this will store contents from address 9 into B register, then adds this value to contents of A register, So, the final value of A register will be 10 and B register will be 3.

At line 2, we have SUB 10, this will store contents from address 10 int B register, then subtracts this value from contents of A register, the final value of A register will be 8 and B register will be 2

At line 3, we have OUT 0, this will OUTPUT the contents of A register on to the console.

Rest of the lines contain NOP instructions.

At line 8, there is 7, this value will be used when line 0 gets executed.
At line 9, there is 3, this value will be used when line 1 gets executed.
At line 10, there is 2, this value will be used when line 3 gets executed.

In this manner, you have to write your assembly program.
And make sure that there are no extra spaces other than spaces between instruction and memory addresses

Once, you write your assembly program, save it. For example, if you have saved it with a name of add.asm, then run the following command to generate .bin file.

python3 eas.py add.asm -o add.bin

This will generate a .bin file. You can run this using the emulator with the following command

./main add.bin 1 where 1 will print the debug info and 0 will omit it.

Building

Clone the repo using git clone https://github.com/0xhh/TinyE8.git and then cd TinyE8.

If you are on Linux, make sure you have g++ working. Then run sh build.sh from the terminal.
It will create main binary file. Run it using ./main <bin file> <debug = 0 or 1>.

If you are on Windows, install C++ compiler using MinGW and then run the following command on the CMD or Powershell

g++ -c src/*.cpp -std=c++14 -g -Wall -I include && g++ *.o -o ./main.exe <bin file> <debug = 0 or 1> and then run main.exe file from CMD or Powershell

TODO

Contributing

Feel free to fork and contribute to this repo. Make sure that your code is readable and add comments wherever they are needed.

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